Sharia Law // Islamic Feminism

Post 10// Week 11

The jihadi movement is significant because it is when Muslims countries gained independence back in 1950. However conflict was created when westernized elites were in charge of that freedom by suppressing values and tradition. In 1979 the Islamic revolution was stared because of the rise against the Soviet Union. With the hopes of creating an Islamic state the Taliban was born. The conflict with the west has paved the way of the current jihad movement that still exist today.

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The jihadi movement is significant because it is when Muslims countries gained independence back in 1950. However conflict was created when westernized elites were in charge of that freedom by suppressing values and tradition. In 1979 the Islamic revolution was stared because of the rise against the Soviet Union. With the hopes of creating an Islamic state the Taliban was born. The conflict with the west has paved the way of the current jihad movement that still exist today.

Sharia law is the law of Islam, which is a set of religious principles, which make up Islamic tradition however it is not the word of the Qur’an. Puritan fundamentalists are deliberate with it comes to Islamic law. “fundamentalists are only concerned with hudud punishment as demonstrable proof that they state is enforcing the whole of Islam” (Sardar and Davies, 118) These fundamentalist practice punishment as a way to deal with crime and believe that this is a way to deal with crime at the most extreme form.

I do not believe that Islamic law has always been consumed with punishment, however things today are different. Sardar and Davies go on to mention how sharia has little owe to the Qur’an and can not be viewed a divine. They also talk about hubud laws, which are laws that entail punishment in extreme circumstances, the example they give in the book explains that if an individual is committed with theft that they should get their hands cut off by doing this it would further prevent that crime from happening again. In todays world Islamic fundamentalists have taken matters into their own hands by saying which crimes have prosecuted with hubud laws are responsible for the punishment we see.

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Islamic Feminism

        After reading the article From Islamic Feminism to a Muslim Holistic Feminism by Margot Badran’ it is better understood what Islamic Feminism is and what they stand for as feminist. An Islamic Feminist is family driven in their views, made by two theoretical advances. “(1) breaking down the notion that the sphere of the family constitutes a separate domain positing instead a continuum of private/family and public/society; and (2) dismantling the notion that Islam ordains a patriarchal construction of the family.”(Badran, 78) Created by Sister in Islam (SIS) who took real life situations, for example wife beating, and showed how the Qur’an didn’t align. Islamic Feminism is different than “Western” and “Secular” as they believe in equality of sexes as well as women’s individual rights in political, economic, and social roles. Secular feminism emerged from a social movement rather then the emerge of discourse. In the late twentieth century a social movement emerged as woman begun to express the discourse of woman’s rights and equality of gender by exploiting their own ijtujad by going directly to the Qur’an and various religious text. I believe that Islamic Feminism has been useful for addressing gender inequalities within Islamic societies and communities’ abroad, as it has brought the attention the unequal difference between the genders.

References:

Badran, M. (2011).  From Islamic Feminism to a Holistic Muslim Feminism.  Retrieved from: https://blackboard.missouri.edu/bbcswebdav/pid-3161660-dt-content-rid-31263463_1/courses/SP2017.GERMAN.4810.01/From%20Islamic%20feminism%20to%20a%20Muslim%20Holistic%20feminism.pdf

Davies, M. & Sardar, Z. The No-Nonsense Guide to Islam. New Internationalist Publications, 2007. Print.

 

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